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Ellen Min
  • Undergraduate Student, Computer Science

Ellen Min

I am a fourth-year undergraduate majoring in computer science and minoring in English. I’m interested in creative applications of computer science. Here are some things I’ve worked on over the past few years: creating Python interfaces for an open-source galaxy modeling framework (Carnegie Observatories), mapping groundwater loss in the Central Valley (ArtCenter), and developing a web-based visualization of satellite landing sites (Lunar Trailblazer). I like writing fiction, drawing, painting, and playing Romantic era pieces on the piano. I also cross-enrolled at Occidental College to study critical and queer theory. For a while, I’ve been unsure whether to pursue a career in STEM or in the arts and humanities. This spring, I’ll be exploring my interest in the arts through Caltech Y’s Studenski Award and I am excited to see where things go. In my free time, I like to skateboard, go on drives, and get sweet treats.

Kaiyu Yang
  • Postdoctoral Scholar, Computing and Mathematical Sciences

Kaiyu Yang

I am a postdoctoral scholar working with Professor Anima Anandkumar. I received my PhD from the Department of Computer Science at Princeton University, advised by Professor Jia Deng. My research focuses on Neurosymbolic AI, which aims to make machine learning capable of symbolic reasoning. I have approached the goal from two angles: (1) applying machine learning to symbolic reasoning tasks, such as mathematical reasoning and theorem proving in formal logic or natural language; (2) introducing symbolic components into machine learning models to make them more interpretable, verifiable, and data efficient. Currently, I'm working on AI that can understand and reason about mathematics. Mathematical reasoning is a critical milestone toward human-level intelligence, and it can potentially transform many important problems in science and engineering, such as solving PDEs and formal verification. My research is recognized with a Siebel Scholar award.

Elham Davoodi
  • Postdoctoral Scholar, Andrew and Peggy Cherng Department of Medical Engineering

Elham Davoodi

I am a third-year postdoc in the Gao Lab within the Department of Medical Engineering at Caltech. My research focuses on additive manufacturing, also known as three-dimensional (3D) printing, with a specific emphasis on healthcare applications. With a background in 3D printing of various polymers, ceramics, and metals, my primary interest lies in advancing technologies that benefit human health. I am currently working on developing minimally invasive 3D printing technologies, enabling the creation of functional biostructures without direct access to the target location. These cutting-edge techniques hold tremendous potential for various therapeutics. I am enthusiastic about exploring novel modifications to existing 3D printing technologies to unlock further practical applications in the healthcare domain. Beyond my research pursuits, I find joy in practicing the violin, hiking, and painting.

Andrew Ji
  • Graduate Student, Applied Physics and Materials Science

Qingxin (Andrew) Ji

I am a 3rd-year PhD candidate in Applied Physics, working with Professor Kerry Vahala. Before joining Caltech, I earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Peking University and was a SURF student at Caltech in 2019. Throughout my academic journey, I have been captivated by the intricate principles behind integrated photonic systems and their ever-expanding possibilities. My research focuses on pushing table-top high-precision optical systems onto a miniaturized chip, in collaboration with UCSB, JPL and NIST. To make contributions in this interdisciplinary field, I believe that it is important to learn from people on both the theory and application sides. When I'm not immersed in the world of photons, you will likely find me on the basketball court or tennis court.

Elif Oral
  • Postdoctoral Scholar, Mechanical and Civil Engineering

Elif Oral

Hello! As a researcher, I am intrigued by the destructive power of the Earth, such that I work on understanding the physical mechanisms that drive earthquakes and related natural hazards. Specifically, I work in the junction of computational mechanics, fracture and soil mechanics, and theoretical and observational seismology. My background is civil engineering, which additionally motivates me to valorize physics-based knowledge to predict the consequences of future events and build resilient cities. Caltech is kind of the cradle of earthquake science and engineering. Working here, amongst the pioneers of many concepts in the field, has been inspiring for my research, and I continue to enjoy the rewarding feeling of pushing my expertise. Plus, when you are an earthquake scientist, living in Southern California becomes an awkward pleasure. Even though they sound scary, earthquakes are the architects shaping unique landscapes.

Ottman Tertuliano
  • AMA Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Penn University

Ottman Tertuliano

From West Africa to the West Coast, Ottman Tertuliano's (MS '15, PhD '19) journey in materials science has brought him to the intersection of nanoscience, biomechanics, and biology. Now the AMA Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics at Penn University, Tertuliano's research group explores how mechanics can combine with biology, leading to enhanced outcomes for musculoskeletal diseases and tissue engineering.